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7 Wonders Strategy 101: A guide for novices and intermediates

here Overview: cheap date lyrics 7 Wonders is a card-drafting/card development game developed by Antoine Bauza. The game spans three ages/rounds (Ages I, II, & III). In each age, players receive seven cards from the Age deck, choose one of those cards, and pass the remainder to an adjacent player. Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players have six cards in play from that Age, discarding the final unused card when their 6th selection has been played. Players reveal and play their drafted cards simultaneously. Some cards have immediate effects, while others award bonuses later in the game. Other cards provide discounts on future purchases, or once played allow for the free construction of later Age “chained” structures. Some cards provide military strength to overpower adjacent players during the military stage at the end of each Age, and other cards simply give victory points. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three Ages, so you need to keep an eye on your closest neighbors in both directions. After three Ages, the game ends and the victory points are calculated. In 7 Wondersthe player with the most victory points wins!

http://kelseymichaelsfineart.com/?p=1659 Your Wonder board dictates your very first strategy decisions in any 7 Wonders game. In the 7 Wonders base game, there are 7 possible wonders that are randomly assigned to each player.  In many ways, your Wonder will set the stage for your game.  What resource does your city produce initially, and what are the perks awarded to you as you build each stage of your Wonder? Should you play the safer “A” side of your Wonder or the sometimes more rewarding “B” side? Also, what are your adjacent neighbors’ Wonder boards, and can their starting resources assist you in eventually building your Wonder stages? Any Wonder board can be used to achieve victory, but there are definitely some stronger perks on certain city’s Wonder stages. There isn’t a horrible imbalance in the Wonder design, but it’s clear to see that some cities have an easier path to particular victory points than others. In the 7 Wonders base game, my personal favorite city is Olympia (“A” side). The Statue of Zeus’ second stage Wonder ability to build any card for free once per Age provides an incredible advantage, especially if you’re lucky enough to get something ordinarily difficult to build like the Palace in Age III.

City: Olympia with Wonder: Statue of Zeus

Plan A: After determining the strengths and weaknesses of your Wonder board, and the same for the players to your immediate left and right, choose a more likely path to victory as your “Plan A” during the start of Age I. This initial plan can involve a number of building focus combinations (Ex. military structures/red plus science buildings/green), or heavy production on mono-focused building with “chains” of free construction (commonly civilian buildings/blue). Another possible “Plan A” involves a well-rounded construction approach for Age I, so that your eggs aren’t all in one basket, and you are less a visible target to opponents. Of course, in Age II, it would be best to choose a construction focus as soon the opportunity presents itself.

Age I & Age II resources

Resource Management: In both Ages I & II, the card-drafting selection will include a high volume of resources, but Age III is devoid of them. So by that point in the game, unless one of your Wonder stages provides resources upon construction, you won’t be able to acquire any last minute resources. Thus if you have selected very few resources throughout the first two Ages, you’ll have to rely on the brown and gray resources of your neighbors (and your supply of available gold to purchase them!). Therefore having a balanced resource stack, both for your Wonder stages and whatever structures you intend to build on your path to victory is a sound strategy. This will also likely mean a steady flow of gold from your neighboring opponents, especially if one or both have neglected their resource accumulation. One common resource strategy among veteran players is to build the Glassworks (manufactured good/gray) ASAP, especially if you intend to build up any science structures (green), expensive late game civilian structures (blue), or the Age III guild structures (purple), as many of these require the glass resource. If you have somehow acquired 3 of one resource, you’re going to benefit much more from having 3 stone or clay than from having 3 wood or ore, since stone and clay building costs are typically higher than wood and ore building costs in the later Ages. Of course, the necessity of having 3 of any one resource is usually due to the last stage Wonder costs (sometimes as high as 4 of a single resource) on your Wonder board.

Plan B: Hopefully by the middle of Age II your initial “Plan A” is a success, and you’ve got a strong spread of your desired buildings. But if things aren’t going well by this point in the game, due to an opponent having a similar strategy or a less-than-ideal card-drafting situation, then it’s time for “Plan B!” Part of the beauty of 7 Wonders involves the ability to redirect strategy, or change construction focus, and still have a fighting chance of winning the game. Your “Plan B” should adjust your path to victory with a different building focus, while still using your Wonder’s perks to their fullest. Of course, a successful switch to “Plan B” will rely heavily on your available resources, good timing, and a little luck in the card-drafting selection after you change strategic course.

Altar/Temple/Pantheon Civilian Structure Chain

X number of players: Strategy often depends on the number of players, due to the different distribution of cards. While the main focus remains on your city and those of the players to your right and left, you simply can’t ignore non-neighboring players in larger games of 4-7 players. If a non-neighboring player shares a similar building strategy, you may find yourself with weak selections being passed your way in card drafting. Catching this problem early may help you in a well-timed decision to switch from your “Plan A” to your “Plan B,” rather than competing with a non-neighbor for structures and resources. Militarily, in 6 or 7 player games, attempts to build up a powerful military presence are only going to take points away from a portion of the other players. But in a 3-player game, the military wins and losses of every age affect everybody, and it’s often unwise to ignore your military structures. A 3-player game is also notoriously short on brown resources, so play the ones you need when they are passed to you. In both 3 and 7-player games, it’s wise to get the resources you need for your Wonder as soon as possible, or risk not getting the latter stages built at all. While a 4-player game may be somewhat lacking in gray resources, there are so many added brown resources that Wonder stage building is hardly a concern. Especially in Age II, you get this huge influx of brown resources in the 4-player game. Conversely, only a single Caravansery (commercial resource structure/yellow) is added in each of the 5 and 6-player games, and no additional resources are added for 7-player games.

Workshop Science Structure & Military Structure Chain

Burying cards under wonders & blocking other players: There are more advanced strategies that involve getting certain resources early in Age I, then “burying” those same resources under the next stage of your wonder as they are passed back to you later in the round or in Age II, thus creating a resource monopoly. This almost always nets you more gold from adjacent players in need of that resource, and in some cases can shut an opponent down from building the resource-heavy final stage of their wonder. Another more in-depth strategy involves blocking other players from building highly desirable structures by similarly “burying” these cards under your Wonder stages, or even by discarding these cards for 3 gold, though the latter action should be only used as a last resort, possibly when your Wonder is already fully constructed. Blocking opponents isn’t necessary to achieve victory. But strategically speaking, if you’re going to “bury” 3 or 4 useless cards under the stages of your Wonder anyway, those cards might as well also be the structures your opponents’ most need for their victory!